Секретная инструкция ЦРУ по технике обманных трюков и введению в заблуждение

  • Title: Секретная инструкция ЦРУ по технике обманных трюков и введению в заблуждение
  • Author: H. Keith Melton
  • ISBN: 9785916710960
  • Page: 181
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Magic or spycraft In against the backdrop of the Cold War the CIA initiated a top secret program code named MKULTRA to counter Soviet mind control and interrogation techniques Realizing that
    Magic or spycraft In 1953, against the backdrop of the Cold War, the CIA initiated a top secret program, code named MKULTRA, to counter Soviet mind control and interrogation techniques Realizing that clandestine officers might need to covertly deploy newly developed pills, potions, and powders against the adversary, the CIA hired America s most famous magician, John Mul Magic or spycraft In 1953, against the backdrop of the Cold War, the CIA initiated a top secret program, code named MKULTRA, to counter Soviet mind control and interrogation techniques Realizing that clandestine officers might need to covertly deploy newly developed pills, potions, and powders against the adversary, the CIA hired America s most famous magician, John Mulholland, to write two manuals on sleight of hand and undercover communication techniques In 1973, virtually all documents related to MKULTRA were destroyed Mulholland s manuals were thought to be among them until a single surviving copy of each, complete with illustrations, was recently discovered in the agency s archives The manuals reprinted in this work represent the only known complete copy of Mulholland s instructions for CIA officers on the magician s art of deception and secret communications.

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      Published :2019-08-22T04:55:40+00:00

    About H. Keith Melton


    1. H. Keith Melton Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Секретная инструкция ЦРУ по технике обманных трюков и введению в заблуждение book, this is one of the most wanted H. Keith Melton author readers around the world.


    857 Comments


    1. The first half of this book is actually a history of the program and the magician who created the manual. That is the better half of the book, and quite fascinating, at least for someone who, like me, has little knowledge of CIA programs in the early Cold War era. I got the book because of my interest in the history of magic, and it didn't disappoint. The manual itself is VERY elementary, and gets a bit boring if you don't actually care about how to make a hollow pencil to carry powders to slip [...]

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    2. I read the first 70 pages before skimming to the end. The information in this book is fascinating, amusing, and horrifying. Melton and Wallace talk about false fingers, false scrotums, explosive cigars (Castro), knife collection suppositories, how to effectively hide someone in a trunk, and more. The use of magic and illusion in the spy game was fascinating, and I can't stop sharing information I've read with other people.However.It's about as fun to read as an extended tax form. The text obviou [...]

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    3. In terms of entertainment, the very lengthy introduction in this book is better than the declassified MKULTRA era manuscript it headlines. Many interesting details about the CIA during the MKULTRA years are discussed, including strange ones, such as the CIA use of prostitutes to lure Johns into motel rooms under surveillence so agents could record the Johns' reaction to various mind altering drugs like LSD. The introduction alone is a must-read for any spy, CIA, or conspiracy geek. Although, a s [...]

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    4. This book did a few things for me. It relieved me of minor wallet congestion by installing a leak where $20 used to be. It also gave me pause to think that if any of this crap was used in the era when we risked obliteration by the Soviets, it damn well might have come from their intense boredom of what we classified. This book wraps a piece of accidentally un-destroyed info in hard cover, adds a few chapters of what-we-once-did crap from the files of , and masterfully uses internet buzz to get t [...]

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    5. BOOOOOOOOOOOOORING

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    6. No, this isn't a book that reveals CIA secrets per se. I love history, and I love some of the "black" history even more. Black meaning covert government programs that were all rage during the cold war. I don't know, but I have to think that other than terrorism, a lot of the covert programs just aren't as much fun as they used to be! The book chronicles the use of modern (of their time) master magicians to help the CIA learn how to master trickery and deception in their spying activities. How co [...]

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    7. The back story on this book is an intriguing one, but in no way deserving of the 80+ repetitive pages of foreword and introduction before actually getting to the declassified material. The techniques of trickery themselves are quite interesting, but frankly, I couldn't bring myself to spend the time to finish it. All in all, I'd say this book is worth skimming, but not digesting in depth. In fact, I dare say that the very best thing about this book is its art design.

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    8. not an awful read but quite tedious and repetitive at times the introduction is quite interesting but once you get to the meat of the story it gets dull pretty quick it's a tad bit dating as one would imagine but I'm not really counting that against it you may or may not like it it was kind of boring to me. but it could the interesting to you especially if you are into this sort of thing

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    9. All about what should be obvious, in painstaking detail.

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    10. The first half of the book is informative and well written, the second half - the actual declassified manual - is exceedingly dry, repetitive, and not terribly enlightening.

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    11. The Official C.I.A. Manual of Trickery and Deception was written at the behest of the CIA in 1953 by John Mulholland, the most famous magician of his time. It details every little sleight of hand a spy could need - how to dose a target with chemical agents, how to exchange items in public without detection, how to conceal everything from a person to tiny slips of paper in other objects. The details are amazing - including how to hide pills and potions for easy delivery, using everything from sho [...]

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    12. Due back at the library today and I'm a little more than halfway done, but that's okay. This is a really fascinating book, and I recommend it to anyone who enjoys learning about spies or covert operations. The first half gives examples of how the US government used magicians' tricks, especially during the Cold War. The second half is the manual itself, which is kind of hard to read (dude needed to be schooled on commas)and a little confusing if you're not actually practicing the tricks while rea [...]

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    13. This book has some interesting information about the craft and techniques used by civilian and military operatives, primarily during WWII and the Cold War. There is some background information about the magician-turned-CIA professor that's also quite entertaining. However, the majority of the book describes magic techniques that could be used to hide liquids in your hands in plain sight or deceptively dropping a powder drug into an unsuspecting person's martini. All interesting, but I only skimm [...]

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    14. This was interesting, if a bit dated and dense. About a third of the book is a lengthy introduction (which felt a little like padding, since the manuals are shorter than a full-length book). The manuals themselves were interesting, but I have to agree with John Mulholland's own assessment of his manuals: "At this point (very possibly at an earlier paragraph) the reader comes to the conclusion that the writer is extremely verbose in explaining a few simple points" (91).

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    15. I'd actually give the introduction 4 stars -- a lengthy, informative overview of the deceptions used post-WWII, interweaving the secrets of Houdini and other notable magicians that had inspired the CIA, MI6, etc. The "declassified" report itself? One star. A little dull, dry, and overly detailed for someone more interested in the history and application of these techniques, than the blow-by-blow in drilling holes into plastic buttons as a signaling device.

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    16. As I read this book I felt that I was watching a James Bond movie. The tricks of the trade are amazing. Houdini and his magic were great examples. The Gary Powers spy plane incident was explained.The spy technology of the past was explained in detail with drawings. How technology has changed over the years. I can't wait to read other books by these authors, who are intelligence historians in the clandestine technology of espionage.

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    17. This book is part declassified CIA Manual, part history of employing "magic" in the CIA. Although all of the known copies had previously been destroyed, a copy was found, making this book possible. The section about plans to assassinate Castro were the most interesting--plans seemingly hatched from a Bugs Bunny Cartoon: exploding cigars, poisoned tobacco plants, etc.

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    18. A good quick read for the history (and absurdity) of CIA spooks and the magician that trained them. The instructions get a little heavy towards the end of the book as the magician that taught them was very theatrical with his language. None the less, if you like spies and learning about spy techniques that you see in old movies, I'd give it a quick read.

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    19. This book was fantastic and super fun. It was a look into Cold War Era history with a mix of the magician techniques of Houdini and John Mulholland coupled with spycraft.There was a nice weave of history and method. I had a lot of fun reading it!

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    20. 42 WORD REVIEW:Although the editors try to spruik the significance of two instructional manuals commissioned from magician John Mulholland by the CIA during the Cold War, closer inspection reveals the most interesting facet of these works to be that they were written at all.

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    21. Introduction has some nice facts on how Houdini operated and what goes into some common tricks. Actual manual is plenty prosaic. Good luck keeping your eyes open there. Some trivia on how CIA operatives operated in the Soviet Union during the cold war.

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    22. An interesting glimpse at a moment of Cold War history when the CIA hired a famous magician to teach them some of his tricks. You probably have a be a fan of both magic and the history of espionage to enjoy it.

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    23. Pretty interesting stuff, although the manuscript itself is a tad long-winded. It's worth the reminder that the CIA had all sorts of crazy schemes to kill Castro back in the day!

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    24. kind of interesting but a tad boring.

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    25. couldn't get into this one, was only able to read about 5 pages a day because of the boredom, finally gave up around page 60.

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    26. It is mostly about how magicians changed the CIA. Neat tricks and stuff.

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    27. I really advise skipping past the laughably long introduction.

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    28. A very interesting book. You can tell that a big part of it was written in the '50s. That aside, it's fun and fascinating.

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    29. Kind of a time capsule, and hilariously misogynistic

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