Writing Beyond Race: Living Theory and Practice

  • Title: Writing Beyond Race: Living Theory and Practice
  • Author: bell hooks
  • ISBN: 9780415539142
  • Page: 307
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Writing Beyond Race Living Theory and Practice What are the conditions needed for folks to bridge cultural and racial divides In Writing Beyond Race noted cultural critic Bell Hooks attempts to model the constructive ways scholars activists an
    What are the conditions needed for folks to bridge cultural and racial divides In Writing Beyond Race , noted cultural critic Bell Hooks attempts to model the constructive ways scholars, activists, and readers can challenge and change systems of domination.

    • ☆ Writing Beyond Race: Living Theory and Practice || ↠ PDF Read by Ä bell hooks
      307 bell hooks
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ Writing Beyond Race: Living Theory and Practice || ↠ PDF Read by Ä bell hooks
      Posted by:bell hooks
      Published :2019-05-17T04:16:58+00:00

    About bell hooks


    1. bell hooks born Gloria Jean Watkins is an African American author, feminist, and social activist Her writing has focused on the interconnectivity of race, class, and gender and their ability to produce and perpetuate systems of oppression and domination She has published over thirty books and numerous scholarly and mainstream articles, appeared in several documentary films and participated in various public lectures Primarily through a postmodern female perspective, she has addressed race, class, and gender in education, art, history, sexuality, mass media and feminism.


    895 Comments


    1. Read in February, had been too overwhelmed by life for , but bell hooks is amazing.Wow, wow, wow. This was done so right. So clear, engaging, and passionate. So smart. A great tool for understanding how white supremacist imperialist capitalist patriarchy works on and oppresses everyone (though not equally—certainly some individuals more than others), and that we cannot overlook the interconnectedness of this oppressive system with everything around us. If we want to take one form of oppression [...]

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    2. I think I am in love with hooks, who is so badassly smart! I love how she shows the interconnectedness of race, gender and class. And how she provides a space where people of any color can communicate and work together. This book has moved me and I think I will take it with me for the rest of my life. I cannot wait to read more books by the author.

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    3. This was really two books in one, with essays about thinking beyond race, fighting white supremacy through critical awareness, and bell hooks' experience disseminating these ideas to a broad audience wrapped around a somewhat disconcerting core of harsh diatribe against a few books and films that have bothered hooks recently (the Help, the Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks) and not-so-recently (e.g. Crash). This essay format was both repetitive and schizophrenic, but still a worthwhile read to ch [...]

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    4. I have read several of bell hooks' books and never cease to be stretched and challenged by her use of language and her radical feminist anti-racist perspective. This book is no exception. While the book's primary audience seems to be African Americans, I continually found myself asking what might this mean for me as a white middle class male. She introduces the admittedly awkward phrase "imperialist white supremacist capitalist patriarchy" to capture the intersection of various domination system [...]

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    5. This was the first time I read a book and my name was quoted in it. So I want to say the book was amazing because I nearly fell out when I saw that bell hooks had read a piece I wrote with my friend and fellow writer, Diana Barnes-Brown. But beyond that, the book was wonderful, as many of her books are. I love the simplicity of her sentences. She deconstructs white supremacist capitalist thought, she talks about the dearth of self-help and self-love tomes for black people generally but black wom [...]

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    6. I learn a lot when I read bell hooks.

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    7. Interesting collection of essays. I'm not at all fond of her essay on Henrietta Lacks, as most of her criticism of Rebecca Skloot's book "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" stems from discontent that the book has a heavy focus on science. bell hooks wishes the book had neglected the importance of the HeLa cell line and instead focused on the ways racism, sexism, and poverty affected Henrietta Lack's life. But Skloot is a scientist, not a critical race theorist, and the medical and scientific [...]

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    8. I read this for a Women's Study course. As a black female writer with some experience in the publishing business, her analysis and discussion of the media including the appropriation of black female narratives and in particular, "The Help" is spot on. This discussion becomes even more important in light of Ta-Nehesi Coates revealing essay about the systematic exclusion of black access to the achievement of financial wealth. I like that she identifies "the system" of dominating patriarchy as the [...]

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    9. bell hooks at her finest- my favorite reminder from this book is that patriarchy starts in the home!

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    10. Amazing!!! Especially her analysis of The Help, Precious, and Crash. As well as her writing about white supremacist thought and black self-determination.

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    11. This was my first book by bell hooks. I wish it had not been. It felt like a way to publish an oddly diverse set of essays, some of which I found rich & moving, others - the book & film reviews mostly - I found hard to get through. I frankly had only been interested in one of the book/movies, the movie "Crash", so to read critiques that essentially validated why I had not read the others was boring. bell hooks is NOT boring. She is an articulate, passionate, insightful author, feminist & [...]

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    12. I had to read this, along with every other student in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Class of 2021 at my school, and I just could not get through it. I mean, I finished it because I had to, but it just dragged on and on. I can't stand the way bell hooks writes. She repeats herself over and over, she uses vocabulary that just seems to be showing off the fact she knows the words, and she seems to have an obsession with repeating the phrase "imperialist white supremacist capitalist patria [...]

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    13. If half stars were an option, I would give this 3 and half but I'll allow an extra half star for intent and execution. hooks (she writes it in lower case so why not) infuses decades of experience into a polemic that inspires and shames and ventures to tell us How We Can Fix Things. While she lost me at the assertion that spirituality is essential for social progress (hard for me to swallow as an atheist), her secular ruminations on community-consciousness-based attitudes about race and gender an [...]

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    14. I spent a long time trying to construct a review that is worthy of this book. I don't know if that is possible because this is honestly one of the best books I've ever read. It's a beautiful collection of essays - some are think pieces, others are book/movie reviews - and an awesome selection of insights that strengthen my commitment to anti-oppressive feminist praxis.The opening lines of a few chapters were so deep that I paused and reflected on them for a few minutes before continuing on. bell [...]

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    15. bell hooks is both accessible and incredible articulate in her writing. Her essays are thoughtful, and though they are critical, they do are not harsh in their judgment of texts. I found her to be very fair while still raising important points in a way that welcomed reader understanding, rather than alienating the reader. I'm looking forward to more of hooks's work.

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    16. Read for my Engendering Rhetorical Power class. Rating is for me not really being able to pin down what the author's attitude towards certain things is. She's got some weird hierarchy of valuing films/literature in a way that privileges art, and yet says that she appreciates a variety of works. Although she argues against binary thinking, it seems like she still engages in it.

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    17. I enjoyed the essays in the book. I liked how each illustrated hooks' use of praise by weaving the theoretical work together with pop culture, personal and familial aspects, and professional connections. I also really enjoyed the movie critiques. I can now see why The Help, Precious, and Crash cannot be the racial challenges they were touted to be.

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    18. Re-reading. Re-visiting perspectives on the perpetuation of the white/ capitalist/ patriarchy, and much relevant to issues of rising religious fundamentalism, interrogating media, committing to excellence, re-examining the role of love, critique and forgiveness.

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    19. How onanistic. There really isn't much point for this book to exist. The people most likely to be reading hooks's works are typically the erudite masses who have little need for her polemical diatribes on oppression.

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    20. This is the sort of book that everyone needs to read. It inspires.

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    21. 305.80097 H784 2013

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    22. I'm a big fan. I love her writing period.

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    23. Incisive critical analysis of so many aspects of our current culture. Empowering and masterfully written. A book I will return to again and again.

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