Schatten an der Wand

  • Title: Schatten an der Wand
  • Author: MartinWalker
  • ISBN: 9783257068436
  • Page: 157
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Schatten an der Wand Martin Walkers fr her Roman ber die Entstehung einer pr historischen H hlenzeichnung deren Verwicklung in blutige Kriege und Intrigen und den erbitterten Kampf von f nf Menschen sie heute zu besitze
    Martin Walkers fr her Roman ber die Entstehung einer pr historischen H hlenzeichnung, deren Verwicklung in blutige Kriege und Intrigen und den erbitterten Kampf von f nf Menschen, sie heute zu besitzen Denn wer sie findet, erh lt den Schl ssel zur Aufkl rung eines Verbrechens, das bis in die h chste Politik reicht und von dem bis heute keiner wissen darf.

    • ☆ Schatten an der Wand || ✓ PDF Read by ✓ MartinWalker
      157 MartinWalker
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ Schatten an der Wand || ✓ PDF Read by ✓ MartinWalker
      Posted by:MartinWalker
      Published :2020-03-02T03:38:47+00:00

    About MartinWalker


    1. Martin Walker is the U.S bureau chief for The Guardian London , a regular commentator for CNN, and a columnist for newspapers in the United States, Europe, and Moscow A published novelist and poet, he lives in Washington, D.C with his wife, the novelist Julia Watson, and their two daughters.


    846 Comments


    1. a shorter review than the book probably deserves, but honestly I was underwhelmed by this Martin Walker historical thriller. I'm not exactly sure what turned me off, because the three interlocking stories that form the novel aren't exactly bad and I was actually traveling through the region, sampling foie-gras and confit de canard as I was reading, visiting Lascaux and most of the other villages mentioned in the story. Maybe it was the heavy political slant of the middle section, the one dealing [...]

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    2. Major Phillip Manners has just buried his father, and his inheritance included a small piece of paleolithic wall art depicting a bull. He takes the painting to Lydia Dean, expert in the preclassical department of a London auction house, for valuation. Astounded by what she sees, she identifies the work as characteristic of the wall paintings found in the caves of the Dordogne, and warns Manners that it probably qualifies as a stolen artifact. Manners informs her that his father brought it home f [...]

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    3. Imagine this! Three intertwined stories, one set 17,000 years ago, one set later on in World War 2, and one set in a more contemporary time. 17,000 years ago, we see the development of a young artist, working in a cave. Then, during World War 2, partisans seeking to disrupt German communications at the time leading up to D-Day,. Finally, contemporary. A fragment of the cave art comes to the attention of a young American woman working for an art business.Involved: a young man with extraordinary a [...]

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    4. I love the premise of this book: following the fate of piece of rock art from prehistoric times when it was created though World War II to present day when it reappears. There is a chapter where the author describes actually going through the cave at Lascaux that gave me the shivers! Structuring a book like this with three vastly different time periods, and therefore different characters, is inherently difficult. The author solved this problem by alternating between the three periods in a consis [...]

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    5. I enjoyed this book. There are three related stories - modern times, 1944, and about 15000 BC. All mostly take place in the Perigord. The book begins in London. Major Manners arrives at the auction house with a painting of a bull on a rock he had inherited from his father. Lydia, asked to check it out, quickly realizes it might be 17,000 years old from the caves in France or Spain. She photographs it, and calls in some experts, but it is stolen before the experts arrive. Manners suggests that he [...]

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    6. The story takes place in three different times: 17000 years ago, WWII in 1944 and contemporary. I loved the archaeological elements,and the 'mystery' was good. There were political elements that were exciting to research and verify. The transitions between eras worked well. So, I liked the plot. I was afraid that the prehistorical romance would be like Jean Auel, but that romance was relatively genuine. The romance in 1944 war-torn France was also well done. However, the contemporary romance was [...]

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    7. Read this for the same reason I read Walker's Inspector Bruno mysteries: for the locale and the feel of local flavor he does very well. This book aspires to be more than it is: it is three connected but different tales: prehistory involving the painters of Lascaux, the Resistance in WW 2 in the same locale, and a case of art theft (of a fragment of a cave painting) set today. I've been to the area, to Lascaux II, to other painted caves, so the idea intrigued me. I found the prehistoric tale inte [...]

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    8. My good friend Tammy recommended this novel, and I thank her for doing so.This is a magnificent, rich novel involving human triumph at its best (through love, leadership and enduring art) and its worst (through war and the struggle for exclusive possession). The novel cycles through the viewpoints of prehistory (15000 BC), the French Resistance (in 1944) and the present. Each of these timeframes has its own triumphs, tragedies and mysteries. There is at least one common thread throughout these d [...]

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    9. Started out gripping. Halfway through I had become bored with details of the 1944 thread. Still can't figure out why the author tells the story of the WW II strand first through the modern day research story and then recounts it again in the 1944 story. It would have been much more gripping to have it unfold through the characters of 1944 first. The end of the book was so abrupt and unsatisfying, I was quite disappointed. This had the potential,of being so much more.

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    10. Another excellent Martin Walker novel with good history. The book moves backwards and forwards in time. The three time periods are 17,000 years ago in France, and World War II France, and today. A good mystery ties it all together.

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    11. When the book opens, Lydia Dean, received a rare walk-in client to the London auction house in which she works. Major Phillip Manners presents a piece of rock with a painting of a bull on it, they both understand this work is likely 12,000 years old and from the Lascaux region of France. Dean lets Major Manners know that the work will have to go back to France, but once authenticated, it is possible a "thank you" in the form of a monetary gift might come from a grateful country to him. Overnight [...]

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    12. I thought this was one of the books in the series Bruno, Chief of Police, but it isn't. It's related, though. It's about two periods in the history of Bruno's region, plus an exploration of them in the present. The first of these covers the adventures of a cave painter and his wife, ca. 15,000 BC, who made magnificent paintings on a cave wall similar to those of Lascaux. The second is a largely historical account of the conflict in the region between a fierce Nazi division and the French Resista [...]

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    13. I LOVED this book. It is historical fiction that takes place during three different periods of time. And since I had just been in the part of France where the three stories take place--and seen a few of the most famous cave paintings--I was totally entranced. It begins with the delivery of a package to a young American woman working in a London auction house. It is brought in by a British military officer, and he had inherited it from his father. The package contains a fragment of a 17,000 year [...]

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    14. Tough to pick shelves for this book: it has several timelines/plot lines, and so a protagonist for each; the times are current, WW2, and pre-history all dealing with the same area of France. There is a mystery - several really - but the main focus to the book is the art.I have always wanted to see the parietal art of southern France. This book deals with that area and the caves, brings in thoughts of yet-unknown art from un (re) discovered caves. The story begins in current times, when the son o [...]

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    15. This is Martin Walker's first fictional novel and it is very engaging. While not showing the panache of his Bruno series (the editing is a little weak), it is our first look into Walker's take on life and customs in South Central France, an area which is now his home. He treats it with respect and lots of historical accuracy. While the story, which spans 17,000 years, is fictional, many of the facts are as accurate as they can be. I always enjoy the author's notes at the end of his books where h [...]

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    16. The book tells three stories which are somewhat interwoven I found the post interesting part set 17,000 years ago when the wonderful cave grasping and paintings of the region were being produced. The anthropological background was used to create a story of tradition and change.The second story is set in WWII and the very complex loyalties of the various cadres in France fighting the Germans and fighting each other.The third story is the modern playing out of leftover conflicts from story 2. I ha [...]

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    17. The Caves of Perigord is a novel with stories set in 3 time periods; modern day, WWII, and 15000 BC. All the stories are set in the Perigord region of France (roughly the Dordogne department). In 15,000 BC the cave painting in Perigord were being done by hunter/gathers and this described. The modern day story concerns a stolen rock containing such a painting. In solving the mystery of how a WWII English captain got the rock and what cave it came from, we learn a lot about the French resistance f [...]

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    18. Martin Walker is an engaging writer, and he weaves together three stories that are entertaining and instructive about the cave drawings of Lascaux: The story of a young artisan from 15,000 years ago; an art historian searching for the origins of a fragment of cave art; and of course, a World War II story (since that is all we read lately). Nicely done and puts me in the mood to visit the Perigord. Of course fois gras is more appealing than the caves, but I'll look forward to both.

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    19. This novel features three time periods: the present, WWII, and prehistoric. Walker does a fine job describing the first two, but I became embarrassed, frustrated, and uninterested in the prehistoric setting. By mid-way through the book, I was skipping ahead when I came to that. I fine idea, using the prehistoric art work in the caves of southern France.

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    20. Different story and characters for WalkerVery satisfying blend of fact and fiction. Walker writes an intelligent story with engaging characters. I enjoyed especially the juxtaposition of ancient, wartime and current history. Different than his Bruno stories but just as much fun.

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    21. This story was both fascinating and confusing. I loved the story of the caves but became bored and distracted by the military portion of the book. Sections dragged due to descriptions of the vehicles and weapons used by the resistance. Not one of my favorites but glad I read it.

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    22. For the fans of Bruno, two characters that show up in his later series, Clothilde and Horst, are introduced here.This was a pretty good historical thriller for those who don't read the Bruno series.

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    23. This was a well researched book. I really enjoyed the historical aspects of the story.

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    24. The Caves of Perigord by Martin Walker3.5 Stars rounded to 4The story follows three timelines - 17,000 years ago, French Resistance in WWII, and present day. The common denominator for each story is the caves at Perigord, specifically those at Lascaux. In present day London, Jack Manners seeks advice from a London auctioneer house on a piece of art inherited within his late father's estate. The art, on a small piece of rock, is strikingly similar to the large cave paintings at Lascaux. Lydia, th [...]

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    25. Der Brite Philip Manners erbt von seinem Vater ein Bild auf einem Steinfragment, das vermutlich aus einer Höhlenmalerei herausgebrochen wurde. Von der Kunsthistorikern Lydia will Philip das Stück Beutekunst schätzen lassen. Selbst wenn man das Fragment zurückbringen wollte, müsste zuvor der Fundort ermittelt werden. Bisher ist nur bekannt, dass Manners Vater im Zweiten Weltkrieg in der Nähe der Höhlen von Lascaux eingesetzt war. Lydia lässt den unverkäuflichen Fund versichern, der jedoc [...]

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    26. Basically 3 timelines: 15000 years ago, 1944, and the present. Major Manners has uncovered a stone with a painting on it reminiscent of the Lascaux paintings, but much smaller. After taking it to an auction house for evaluation, it goes missing. This is the story of how the painting came to be (15000 BCE), how it arrived at Manners home (French Resistance hiding in caves, 1944), and what the protagonists (Lydia et al) are doing to recover it (present).Brief synopsis: Talented young artist (circa [...]

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    27. I read this while traveling in France, in part, with the goal of seeing some of the decorated caves in the Perigord. I've read several of Walker's mysteries featuring "Bruno, Chef de Police." I liked those books for the setting and Bruno's character--part Renaissance man, part farmer, kind, and with an admirable moral uprightness. This book was somewhat different. Although Walker often covers topics related to World War II, this focused on it more pointedly. Personally, I found the switch from t [...]

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    28. This novel is more of a thriller than Walker's much more appealing Bruno mysteries, but moves too slowly to really thrill. It is told in three time periods, the present, WWII and 15,000 years ago. The characters and story set in the present appealed to me just as much as the Bruno books, but the WWII and especially the ancient characters seemed to exist primarily to drive the people and plot in the present. But maybe that is at least partially because I do not usually connect with nor choose to [...]

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    29. Occasionally you do this, buy a book on a whim and it turns out to be one of the best books you have ever read. Starting this book, I liked the present day scenes but was immediately sceptical of the idea of running two other eras alongside it, especially as one of them was 17000 years ago. What, I thought, could possibly be interesting from then?But this book is a masterpiece, the way the plot weaves the three eras together, the immense detail, and the human emotion in each period. It was so we [...]

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