Fugitives and Refugees: A Walk in Portland, Oregon

  • Title: Fugitives and Refugees: A Walk in Portland, Oregon
  • Author: Chuck Palahniuk
  • ISBN: 9781400047833
  • Page: 158
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Fugitives and Refugees A Walk in Portland Oregon Want to know where Chuck Palahniuk s tonsils currently reside Been looking for a naked mannequin to hide in your kitchen cabinets Curious about Chuck s debut in an MTV music video What goes on at the
    Want to know where Chuck Palahniuk s tonsils currently reside Been looking for a naked mannequin to hide in your kitchen cabinets Curious about Chuck s debut in an MTV music video What goes on at the Scum Center How do you get to the Apocalypse Caf In the closest thing he may ever write to an autobiography, Chuck Palahniuk provides answers to all these questions and mWant to know where Chuck Palahniuk s tonsils currently reside Been looking for a naked mannequin to hide in your kitchen cabinets Curious about Chuck s debut in an MTV music video What goes on at the Scum Center How do you get to the Apocalypse Caf In the closest thing he may ever write to an autobiography, Chuck Palahniuk provides answers to all these questions and as he takes you through the streets, sewers, and local haunts of Portland, Oregon According to Katherine Dunn, author of the cult classic Geek Love, Portland is the home of America s fugitives and refugees Get to know these folks, the most cracked of the crackpots, as Palahniuk calls them, and come along with him on an adventure through the parts of Portland you might not otherwise believe actually exist No other travel guide will give you this kind of access to a little history, a little legend, and a lot of friendly, sincere, fascinating people who maybe should ve kept their mouths shut Here are strange personal museums, weird annual events, and ghost stories Tour the tunnels under downtown Portland Visit swingers sex clubs, gay and straight See Frances Gabe s famous 1940s Self Cleaning House Look into strange local customs like the I Tit a Rod Race and the Santa Rampage Learn how to talk like a local in a quick vocabulary lesson Get to know, I mean really get to know, the animals at the Portland zoo.Oh, the list goes on and on.

    • Unlimited [Paranormal Book] ↠ Fugitives and Refugees: A Walk in Portland, Oregon - by Chuck Palahniuk â
      158 Chuck Palahniuk
    • thumbnail Title: Unlimited [Paranormal Book] ↠ Fugitives and Refugees: A Walk in Portland, Oregon - by Chuck Palahniuk â
      Posted by:Chuck Palahniuk
      Published :2019-08-21T14:00:59+00:00

    About Chuck Palahniuk


    1. Written in stolen moments under truck chassis and on park benches to a soundtrack of The Downward Spiral and Pablo Honey, Fight Club came into existence The adaptation of Fight Club was a flop at the box office, but achieved cult status on DVD The film s popularity drove sales of the novel Chuck put out two novels in 1999, Survivor and Invisible Monsters Choke, published in 2001, became Chuck s first New York Times bestseller Chuck s work has always been infused with personal experience, and his next novel, Lullaby, was no exception Chuck credits writing Lullaby with helping him cope with the tragic death of his father Diary and the non fiction guide to Portland, Fugitives and Refugees, were released in 2003 While on the road in support of Diary, Chuck began reading a short story entitled Guts, which would eventually become part of the novel Haunted.In the years that followed, he continued to write, publishing the bestselling Rant, Snuff, Pygmy, Tell All, a remix of Invisible Monsters, Damned, and most recently, Doomed Chuck also enjoys giving back to his fans, and teaching the art of storytelling has been an important part of that In 2004, Chuck began submitting essays to ChuckPalahniuk on the craft of writing These were How To pieces, straight out of Chuck s personal bag of tricks, based on the tenants of minimalism he learned from Tom Spanbauer Every month, a Homework Assignment would accompany the lesson, so Workshop members could apply what they had learned all 36 of these essays can currently be found on The Cult s sister site, LitReactor.Then, in 2009, Chuck increased his involvement by committing to read and review a selection of fan written stories each month The best stories are currently set to be published in Burnt Tongues, a forthcoming anthology, with an introduction written by Chuck himself His next novel, Beautiful You, is due out in October 2014.


    325 Comments


    1. It's a quick read, and a fun primer (in parts) of Portland's underground and history, mixed with a bit of Palahnuik's attempt at autobiography. I actually give this book more like two and a half stars, but since doesn't work like Star Search, I don't have that option.The book lost points with me for being uncomfortably seedy in places; to put it more plainly, a chapter with restaurant recommendations, great local gardens, or tips on how to pronounce local streets was often immediately followed [...]

      Reply

    2. Just go to Portland. I have been there 7 times. Just outside of the city are the mountains and waterfalls (a five minute drive). Perhaps my favorite city in the U.S it is full of life, culture, hate, and wonder and yet still costs as much as living in Tulsa. I plan on moving there after my Bachelor's degree. Screw the book, just book a flight.

      Reply

    3. Non-Fiction. Palahniuk takes us on a tour of Portland's sex clubs, hardware stores, gardens, and ghosts. As long as you consider Newberg and Maryhill to be part of Portland, which they decidedly are not.I'm not sure if this book will have any appeal to people unfamiliar with Portland -- the travel guide aspect is thin on the ground -- but I liked it. Sometimes you just want to read a book about the place where you live. That self-satisfied thrill when you recognize the landmarks, the off-hand di [...]

      Reply

    4. I had issues with this. For one, the ONLY time he talks about ethnicity in the book was when he was jumped by a group of "black men with black hoods". Identifying his muggers as black (and OTHER) sets himself on pretty shaky ground, and in a city that is 80+% white, i can't see how this is NOT an issueSO-- he talks about a gay man who was trying to sleep with him which was "capital NOT going to happen." Again, you weren't going to sleep with anyone else in the book, so why single this man out? O [...]

      Reply

    5. Review from my blog:I started and finished Fugitives & Refugees, thus ending my resolve to not read any more Chuck books this week. Yes, we're on a first name basis. That's mainly cos I don't really know how to pronounce his last name and I feel better about just calling him Chuck. Anyway, Fugitives & Refugees was really good – a series of vignettes and travel tips about and within Portland, Oregon – my close personal friend Chuck‘s home since 1980. Some of them are crazy, some are [...]

      Reply

    6. In short, this collection of non-fiction essays is a love letter to Portland. If the style of this guide book appeals to you, if the odd, macabre, and sometimes loathsome puts you in just the right mood, if you want an adventure, come to Portland. Then read Fugitives and Refugees. The rain merely keeps the riff raff out and the green in. The battle for Canine Equal Rights has been won. The microbrew revolution began here and is thriving. And the people are as weird and welcoming as you could eve [...]

      Reply

    7. Love this book. It is, however a decade old by now, so some of the stuff has aged and passed on.The Willamette Weekly did an awesome job covering all the stuff in this book in July 2013 to see what was still there, what was gone, and to make some suggestions. There's the first article which gives a nice little history of the book itself wweek/portland/articleAnd the second which goes through just about everything between the covers to see what's what in 2013 wweek/portland/blog-30

      Reply

    8. Quotes:"Everyone in Portland is living a minimum of three lives," says Katherine Dunn, the author of Geek Love. She says, "Everyone has at least three identities.""They're a grocery store checker, an archaeologist, and biker guy," she says. "Or they're a poet, a drag queen, and a bookstore clerk."The Devil's Triangle: The triangle formed by W Burnside Street and SW Stark and Eleventh. Occupied for years by the Silverado bar and the Club Portland men's bathhouse. Lake No-Negro/Fake Lost Ego/Fake [...]

      Reply

    9. This series by Crown is an interesting one - 2nd tier celebrities (or, maybe better put, major figures in sub-major circuits) pen brief volumes that are half ode to their hometown/half visitors guide to the city they love. In a way, it could be a comprehensive guide to where that person would take you if they really cared about you, enjoyed your company, and were putting you up for a month. As a volume, this particular book isn't terribly strong. The writing is often pedestrian, and the structur [...]

      Reply

    10. The book hooked me in the Purple Room at Powell's with the first sentence, a quote from fellow Portlander and author Katherine Dunn's Geek Love: "'Everyone in Portland is living a minimum of three lives.'" (I'm not suggesting anything insidious here, but there are so many references to the other Doubleday author Dunn and her book that the word "product placement" did cross my mind.) I was there for a week on a work trip and even then I caught a glimpse of at least three Portlands: a fit wealthy [...]

      Reply

    11. It's not a secret that Chuck Palahniuk is one of my favorite writer's but I had never read this, his foray into non-fiction. This is an ode to Chuck's hometown, Portland, Oregon. The delightful thing about this book is it is a tour-guide to what some would call the "underbelly" (and certainly includes the famous Underground) of this city. Within these pages you will find out how to hook-up with housewives, businessmen (if that's how you swing) and prostitutes. You will find directions to the loc [...]

      Reply

    12. I burned through this thing in less than 24 hours (its very short ie about 165 pages). It was really quite enjoyable, being both interesting and informative about numerous, often-strange aspects of life in Portland, Oregon well as containing some sheer hilarity (the anecdote about the "laser Floyd" show in 1980, may be the single funniest thing I've read since finishing John Kennedy Toole's "A Confederacy of Dunces," nearly two years ago).Having been published in 2003, its doubtless out-of-date [...]

      Reply

    13. Chuck Palahniuk seems much better suited to this non-fiction writing than his usual books. InFugitives and Refugees he manages to convey the heart and strange soul of Portland in a very human way. The oddities that he mentions he does so with a humble love and wry smirk that is difficult to not find utterly endearing. It made me want to visit Portland rather badly, though I unfortunately didn't quite have a chance.The section on Santa Clause is particularly memorable. As is, always, the myriad o [...]

      Reply

    14. In this book, Palahniuk gives an insiders guide to some of the more odd things in and around Portland. He describes the neighborhoods, places of interest, and the things that makes Portland weird and oh so loveable. It's a quick read that should be bought before traveling, whenyou move here, or even if you've lived here your whole life. There is all kinds of information in this book no one would know otherwise. Plus, he gives his own personal experiences living and traveling here to make it more [...]

      Reply

    15. It was ok. Some parts were really interesting, and I loved the "postcards" which were basically just snapshots of his life in Portland, but I felt like a lot of times it was here is a sentence about this place and seven sentences of directions on how to get there also their phone number. I think I might have liked this more if I had been to, or knew more about Portland. It was entertaining , and I enjoyed it, but over all just alright, nothing super spectacular.

      Reply

    16. A fun and easy read about the city of Portland and Palahniuk's experiences in the city, I read in less than 24 hours. 3/4 of it was a tour book and 1/4 autobiographical - I wish that were reversed. There was a long section about the zoo, but not a single personal story of him at the zoo. The ghost stories were a lot of fun and after reading the history about Darcelle's I really want to go back. Maybe after my tour of the Shanghai Tunnels

      Reply

    17. if you're after a travel guide (and you're going to portland in like 2001) then this is five stars. but it's actually a bit boring skimming through the lists of places to go and all their phone numbers etc. His "postcards from" chapters are great though. Little snippets of his past in Portland.

      Reply

    18. To be honest I would have been comfortable giving this 1 star, except it would probably be useful for people who are moving to or maybe visiting Portland. More an exploration of the strangeness that is Portland Oregon than an autobiography. Mildly entertaining at best, Chuck fans can skip this one.

      Reply

    19. I recall buying this book waaaay back when it first came out, before the Kindle was a thing. I got less than half way through it and I either left it somewhere or someone stole it - I can't really remember - and I never got around to finishing it. I wasn't engrossed enough to go out and buy another copy, so I just let it go. Until last week when the eBook was on sale and I just couldn't resist.I love love love Chuck P.'s early work - Fight Club, Invisible Monsters, Choke, Lullaby, and Survivor a [...]

      Reply

    20. An alternative tourist guide to the weird, wacky, wasted, and well, bawdy, attractions of this somewhat unique corner of America. Sure, just about every city and town has its unusual and salacious (and disturbing) hidden historical (with supposedly haunted) spots, but Portland, Oregon, seems to have them in abundance---as well as a more-open and freewheeling local culture that seems to thrive on it. More power to them. Still, this is not a travel guide I would offer to my children. I, on the oth [...]

      Reply

    21. Part travelogue, part reminiscence of his life in Portland. This is a quick and fun romp through the city and Chuck's life. If I was spending more than a few days here or lived here, I would definitely check out some of the places. But for a short stay traveler this is really more of a glimpse into the weird of Keep Portland Weird scene. It's fun and nice and all the folks who share there stories seem like good people enjoying their slice the world. Though this is a bit dated and some of the pla [...]

      Reply

    22. I've only ever read Fight Club by Palahniuk, but I did grow up near Portland and was quite curious what this book would hold. About half-way through reading it (so, a day), I realized this was just one in a series of "A Walk in CITY" books. This book certainly shows some peculiar sides of Portland, but I would not use it as a guide book in any way, and I would not particularly recommend it to a fan of Fight Club. Overall, this is a dramatized book which gives zero indication of what "A Walk in P [...]

      Reply

    23. Si tratta a tutti gli effetti di una guida turistica. Assolutamente consigliata se avete intenzione di visitare Portland. I luoghi più interessanti e più strani sono elencati tutti qui. Per tutti i fan di Palahniuk invece, questo libro può rappresentare la descrizione dei luoghi e delle esperienze che hanno ispirato lo scrittore per i suoi libri più famosi. Decisamente bizzarro, ma apprezzabilissimo.

      Reply

    24. Thinking of visiting/moving to Portland? Read this R-rated unofficial travel guide first. As a native, I can vouch for the authenticity of most of it. Perhaps the reasons why I think dementors are circling SE can be found within the pages.If you're a native and don't want to be, don't bother. It will just confirm your suspicions that you are in the wrong place. The stuff you don't already know, you won't want to.

      Reply

    25. Good timesand memories. This was a lot of fun to read, making me laugh more than once. It has been years since I've had wandering around time in PDX, and I'm guessing a fair number of these things are gone in the 15 years since publication, but it would be so worth seeing what's still there. Also, I'm glad I didn't know that's why there were all the peacocks on the Maryhill Museum grounds.

      Reply

    26. Trademark Palahniuk: quick-read and stranger than fiction. As I have pretensions to being a hardcore off the beaten path traveler, this is an ideal guide for my future visit to (or residence in?) Portland. The autobiographical insertions are rather middling, though I do envy the variety of off-tilt experiences he's had. Time to make it weird!

      Reply

    27. I wanted it to be better. I really like all of his fictional works. This book however, is more like an old travel blog. It has some interesting history if you live or care about Portland, but otherwise, the suggestions are outdated. The little bits of his life are fun to read, but that is about 10% of the book.

      Reply

    28. Chuck Palahniuk recounts brief, eclectic scenes from his own life in Portland in the 1980s as well as provides to the layman reader some highlights of Portland. Not too sure how outdated (2003) the suggestions are, but history is never outdated, however odd or haunted it may be.

      Reply

    29. "Here's just the tip of the Portland, Oregon, iceberg. Myths. Rumors. Ghost stories. Recipes. What follows is a little history, a little legend, and a lot of friendly, sincere, fascinating people who maybe should've kept their mouths shut."

      Reply

    30. There was an incredible amount of crap tucked into the copy I got from the library. Maybe that set the tone.

      Reply

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *