An Iron Wind: Europe Under Hitler

  • Title: An Iron Wind: Europe Under Hitler
  • Author: Peter Fritzsche
  • ISBN: 9780465057740
  • Page: 165
  • Format: Hardcover
  • An Iron Wind Europe Under Hitler World War II reached into the homes and lives of ordinary people in an unprecedented way Civilians made up the vast majority of those killed by war On Europe s home front the war brought the German b
    World War II reached into the homes and lives of ordinary people in an unprecedented way Civilians made up the vast majority of those killed by war On Europe s home front, the war brought the German blitzkrieg, followed by long occupations and the racial genocide of the Holocaust In An Iron Wind, historian Peter Fritzsche draws on first person accounts to show how civilWorld War II reached into the homes and lives of ordinary people in an unprecedented way Civilians made up the vast majority of those killed by war On Europe s home front, the war brought the German blitzkrieg, followed by long occupations and the racial genocide of the Holocaust In An Iron Wind, historian Peter Fritzsche draws on first person accounts to show how civilians in occupied Europe struggled to understand this maelstrom As Germany targeted Europe s Jews for deportation and death, confusion and mistrust reigned People tried desperately to make sense of the horrors around them, but the stories they told themselves often justified a selfish indifference to their neighbors fates.Piecing together the broken words of World War II s witnesses and victims probing what they saw and what they failed to see Fritzsche offers a haunting picture of the most violent conflict in human history.

    • Best Read [Peter Fritzsche] ↠ An Iron Wind: Europe Under Hitler || [Humor and Comedy Book] PDF ↠
      165 Peter Fritzsche
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Peter Fritzsche] ↠ An Iron Wind: Europe Under Hitler || [Humor and Comedy Book] PDF ↠
      Posted by:Peter Fritzsche
      Published :2019-06-21T15:27:16+00:00

    About Peter Fritzsche


    1. Peter Fritzsche Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the An Iron Wind: Europe Under Hitler book, this is one of the most wanted Peter Fritzsche author readers around the world.


    707 Comments


    1. A brilliant look into the mindset of citizens in Nazi-occupied Europe, and the inability of words to express the unprecedented horror of the Final Solution. The comparison of life under the Nazis as experienced by the French, Poles and Jews of all nationalities was particularly compelling, and illustrated how people could be cowed by both fear and disbelief as the occupation unfolded.A great work of social history, and highly recommended, if you want to understand life during WWII, and perhaps d [...]

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    2. The subtitle is more expansive than the book: Fritzsche professes to be describing everyday life under Hitler, which is understandably too sprawling a topic to cover exhaustively. Still, you might expect something more than the narrative account here, which consists of thematically grouped first-person accounts -- many of them fictionalized and often already well-known, like The Silence of the Sea or Suite Française -- from France and Poland (with occasional asides into German or Swiss accounts [...]

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    3. An Iron Wind: Europe Under Hitler from Peter Fritzsche is an excellent examination of people's lives in Europe leading up to Hitler's rule prior to World War II and during the occupation. Fritzsche uses first-hand accounts, literary references, and more to piece together a different take on Europe during this time period. It's certainly a herculean task on the author's part considering how extensively this time period and subject has previously been covered. So it ends up being all the more impr [...]

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    4. How do an occupied people react to intruders in their country? In An Iron Wind, Peter Fritzsche attempts to unravel the complicated answer to the Nazi occupation of Europe.Jean-Paul Sartre’s words summed up the thoughts of the silent majority: “What is the right thing to do? The idea of who is one’s enemy is only clear and definite when that enemy is on the other side of the fighting line.”Deeply researched, Fritzsche's book uses first person accounts, letters, and diaries to piece toget [...]

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    5. This is a superb book that I might easily rate as a 5 as its message sinks in. Fritzsche's intent is to provide a history of the experience of life under Nazi occupation in WW2. This general intent has been done before and well, recently by Mark Mazower. In books like "Hitler's Empire" and "Dark Continent". What makes this book different is that it draws almost exclusively from the first person accounts and diaries of people who lived under Nazi rule. These sources have become more available in [...]

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    6. One sometimes wonders if there is nothing new to say about the Holocaust. Well, here is THE BOOK. Fritzsche documents WWII as told in the letters, diaries, essays, newspapers, and ordinary narratives of ordinary people. Also acts of defiance such as the French refusing to change their watches to German time. I learned so much and also got a sense of why WWII narratives are written the way they are. People on both sides had a hard time believing the events even as they were participating or livin [...]

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    7. Fritzsche is a meditative & thoughtful writer and belongs among the most interesting historians working today. I am supposed to be an expert on the same period and some of the same themes but this book managed to surprise me and make me wonder on numerous occasions: the author poses many great questions, takes unexpected angles, and is very keen on providing original reflections on his sources. The book is densely packed and a challenging but rewarding read.

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    8. A densely written book, at times it was difficult to absorb more than a few pages at a time. It provides a depth of detail as to how what turned out to be the systematic mass extermination of millions of innocents was seen from various points of view . However, I do believe the narrative went off the rails a little with a long, seemingly aimless discourse of how Jews relationship to God was affected by the killings.

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    9. Based on the introduction, I found the book to be less organized than I thought it would be. However, the quotations were excellent, and they evoked real feelings about the people who wrote them. I would have liked there to be more extended passages of quotes, though. Fritzche says that after writing history, he wanted to write about the people themselves who were part of it. I think another book should be forthcoming - more in-depth quotes and more excellent insight.

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    10. Historian Peter Fritzsche uses primary sources (diaries, letters, and eyewitness reports) to research how Europe devolved into chaos during World War II. It was the first war on the European continent that killed more civilians than soldiers. Although many were killed across the continent, the occupation in Eastern Europe was crueler and bloodier than the occupation in Western Europe. Putting the whole continent on "Berlin Time", constantly playing military music on public loudspeakers, creating [...]

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    11. Parts of the books were 4 or 5 star towards the end. Particularly his discussions of the relationship of different peoples to God and to religion. How did (did one) one retain a relationship with God in a time of destruction? It was also both frightening and fascinating how Germans felt compelled to record their actions. Jews recorded the history of their time for very different reasons.

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    12. This was a great read.

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    13. This book attempts to explain how WWII affected European civilians. It is powerful and horrifying. Not as well organized as I would have liked, but how does one organize this topic?

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    14. A different approach to a much-covered topic. In addition to relying on many first-person accounts, it brings some literary classics into the discussion and how the war is perceived through the lens of those works. Specifically, authors such as Tolstoy and Dostoevsky among others. Many in Europe compared Hitler's invasion of Russia through Tolstoy's " War and Peace", how the events were similar and different.It also traces the unfolding of the war through the mindset of the civilians in respecti [...]

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    15. NYT's 100 Notable Books of 2016

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    16. In his book, “An Iron Wind,” author Peter Fritzsche attempts to capture the mindset of civilians caught in the dismal and horrific abysses dominating towns and cities surviving through the violent wake of the Nazi’s slow but sure advancement toward their goal of expanding their “living space” across much of Europe. One would think that the non-targets of Nazi aggression would express strong concern for Jews since most of the Poles and French were far from ignorant about what was happen [...]

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    17. Very thoroughly researched and detailed account of civilians perspectives of Hitler's war. Although dense content, Fritzsche is a skilled writer and provided comprehensive concluding summaries. Additionally, this is a timely read in light of current political and economic transitions globally.One complaint to editors: typos, particularly in early chapters, detracted from content. This is avoidable!

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    18. ``An Iron Wind: Europe Under Hitler'' By Peter Fritzsche is a gripping, tightly written narrative of events of World War II away from the battlefield, focusing on the victims of the war rather than the perpetrators, namely, the French living with Germans, the plunder of the Jews in the Warsaw Ghetto, and Germans falling away from their religion to follow a new master: Adolf Hitler.Not only did the Germans lose their religion, so did the Jews after the gassing and exterminations, mass murders, ga [...]

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    19. I was driven into silence by this book.Author allowed me to dip a toe into the tortured efforts of people caught in the occupation of Europe to come to intellectual grips with this experience.Through this book I have found a greater freedom from certainty and total understanding; that narratives and understanding can be tortured. That both offer insight through the seen, the unseen, the said, the unsaid, the written, and in the spaces between the lines.

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    20. Even though this was more panoramic, covering all of Europe, I vastly prefer The German War by Stargardt. That book was a revelation page by page whereas this filled in with a lot of previously well trod info. Still quite good.

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