The Art of Doing Science and Engineering: Learning to Learn

  • Title: The Art of Doing Science and Engineering: Learning to Learn
  • Author: Richard Hamming
  • ISBN: 9789056995010
  • Page: 113
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Art of Doing Science and Engineering Learning to Learn Highly effective thinking is an art that engineers and scientists can be taught to develop By presenting actual experiences and analyzing them as they are described the author conveys the development
    Highly effective thinking is an art that engineers and scientists can be taught to develop By presenting actual experiences and analyzing them as they are described, the author conveys the developmental thought processes employed and shows a style of thinking that leads to successful results is something that can be learned Along with spectacular successes, the author alHighly effective thinking is an art that engineers and scientists can be taught to develop By presenting actual experiences and analyzing them as they are described, the author conveys the developmental thought processes employed and shows a style of thinking that leads to successful results is something that can be learned Along with spectacular successes, the author also conveys how failures contributed to shaping the thought processes Provides the reader with a style of thinking that will enhance a person s ability to function as a problem solver of complex technical issues Consists of a collection of stories about the author s participation in significant discoveries, relating how those discoveries came about and, most importantly, provides analysis about the thought processes and reasoning that took place as the author and his associates progressed through engineering problems.

    • ✓ The Art of Doing Science and Engineering: Learning to Learn || ↠ PDF Read by ↠ Richard Hamming
      113 Richard Hamming
    • thumbnail Title: ✓ The Art of Doing Science and Engineering: Learning to Learn || ↠ PDF Read by ↠ Richard Hamming
      Posted by:Richard Hamming
      Published :2019-08-19T05:18:19+00:00

    About Richard Hamming


    1. Richard Wesley Hamming February 11, 1915 January 7, 1998 was an American mathematician whose work had many implications for computer science and telecommunications His contributions include the Hamming code which makes use of a Hamming matrix , the Hamming window described in Section 5.8 of his book Digital Filters , Hamming numbers, sphere packing or hamming bound and the Hamming distance.Hamming received his bachelor s degree from the University of Chicago in 1937, a master s degree from the University of Nebraska in 1939, and finally a Ph.D from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign in 1942 He was a professor at the University of Louisville during World War II, and left to work on the Manhattan Project in 1945, programming one of the earliest electronic digital computers to calculate the solution to equations provided by the project s physicists The objective of the program was to discover if the detonation of an atomic bomb would ignite the atmosphere The result of the computation was that this would not occur, and so the United States used the bomb, first in a test in New Mexico, and then twice against Japan Later, from 1946 to 1976, he worked at the Bell Telephone Laboratories, where he collaborated with Claude Shannon During this period, he was an Adjunct Professor at the City College of New York, School of Engineering On July 23, 1976 he moved to the Naval Postgraduate School, where he worked as an Adjunct Professor until 1997, when he became Professor Emeritus He died a year later in 1998.He was a founder and president of the Association for Computing Machinery His philosophy on scientific computing appears as preface to his 1962 book on numerical methods The purpose of computing is insight, not numbers.Awards Turing Award, Association for Computing Machinery, 1968.Fellow of the IEEE, 1968EE Emanuel R Piore Award, 1979.Member of the National Academy of Engineering, 1980.Harold Pender Award, University of Pennsylvania, 1981EE Richard W Hamming Medal, 1988.Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery, 1994.Basic Research Award, Eduard Rhein Foundation, 1996.Certificate of Merit, Franklin Institute, 1996The IEEE Richard W Hamming Medal, named after him, is an award given annually by Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers IEEE , for exceptional contributions to information sciences, systems and technology , and he was the first recipient of this medal.Hamming discusses the use and potential of computers in the 1965 film Logic By Machine.


    377 Comments


    1. Hamming's essay, "The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics" (together with Eugene Wigner's precursor piece, "The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences", is one of the four or five most important papers I've ever read:Prologue. It is evident from the title that this is a philosophical discussion. I shall not apologize for the philosophy, though I am well aware that most scientists, engineers, and mathematicians have little regard for it; instead, I shall give this [...]

      Reply

    2. A book full of wisdom from an engineer and scientist who spent his entire life in computing and research. Richard Hamming discusses why scientist do things they do, how leaders are different from followers, how to spot trends and focus on the core, what changes are going to take place in the near future and how do we adapt to them. "Luck favors the prepared", indeed a quote that is the main theme of this book. Recommend to anyone in the search of the meaning of work, research and generally life. [...]

      Reply

    3. Hamming's goal with this book is to teach style and creativity to people who do engineering or research. He primarily does this using a ton of anecdotes from his own research career. He'll give a story about doing something or other, then explain how it relates to the broader picture of being a top notch researcher. The book itself is organized into separate chapters, each focusing on a technical area that Hamming was interested in. He gives enough information to understand the topic (assuming y [...]

      Reply

    4. You know it's a good book for who wants to learn how to be developer or engineer. For beginning this book is amazing , It is simple and teach a lot of things about Programs. Give information about they structures, foundation, and teach how to correctly use these programmers for you benefits.

      Reply

    5. I read this because Bret Victor really likes it. There's a lot in here and I will probably get a lot out of it if I read it again later.What did I expect going in? Some sort of philosophy or method that Hamming synthesized through his own experience - how Hamming thinks about doing meaningful technical work. What did I get? A sense of the man himself, and how he went about thinking about various fields. I think each set of lectures has an interesting insight. The subject matter, although interes [...]

      Reply

    6. This book is nice to read before your career start. Though some content might be obsolete nowadays - chapters 25-30 on system thinking, creativity and expertise are extremely valuable.

      Reply

    7. I wish I had read this book 2-3 years ago.

      Reply

    8. Lots of skippable stuff for non technical audiences, but the first few and last few chapters are goldmines for anyone.

      Reply

    9. Dr. Richard Hamming does an excellent job describing the knowledge he learned over the course of his career in regards to becoming successful and a leader in ones field. The book was written as a text book for his graduate level capstone course at the Naval Postgraduate school. He tries to convey the knowledge that he had to learn the hard way over the course of his long career; he wish he had been taught these facts and he attempts to do just that in this text. Since Hamming was a mathematician [...]

      Reply

    10. A book everyone should read, even if they don't like the math. Mr. Hamming lived through the history of modern computing, and along the way acquired wisdom and stories, so skip the math if you like and read it for the rest. An excellent description of the limitations of science, and the value of the skeptical and learning mind. Loved it.

      Reply

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *