The Tangible Kingdom: Creating Incarnational Community

  • Title: The Tangible Kingdom: Creating Incarnational Community
  • Author: Hugh Halter Matt Smay
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 203
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • The Tangible Kingdom Creating Incarnational Community Written for those who are trying to nurture authentic faith communities and for those who have struggled to retain their faith The Tangible Kingdom offers theological answers and real life stories th
    Written for those who are trying to nurture authentic faith communities and for those who have struggled to retain their faith, The Tangible Kingdom offers theological answers and real life stories that demonstrate how the best ancient church practices can re emerge in today s culture, through any church of any size In this remarkable book, Hugh Halter and Matt Smay twoWritten for those who are trying to nurture authentic faith communities and for those who have struggled to retain their faith, The Tangible Kingdom offers theological answers and real life stories that demonstrate how the best ancient church practices can re emerge in today s culture, through any church of any size In this remarkable book, Hugh Halter and Matt Smay two missional leaders and church planters outline an innovative model for creating thriving grass roots faith communities.

    • Best Read [Hugh Halter Matt Smay] ☆ The Tangible Kingdom: Creating Incarnational Community || [Music Book] PDF Ã
      203 Hugh Halter Matt Smay
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      Posted by:Hugh Halter Matt Smay
      Published :2019-05-04T04:18:01+00:00

    About Hugh Halter Matt Smay


    1. Hugh Halter is a pastor and popular author of numerous books including Flesh, The Tangible Kingdom, And, Sacrilege, and Primer Hugh and Cheryl are presently enjoying the spoils of empty nest living but love to use their ranch as a haven of celebration, hospitality, and friendship to the lost and least on the south side of Denver.


    545 Comments


    1. Halter and Smay’s book was an interesting read. While I appreciated their warmth for evangelism and authenticity, I have a major point of contention with one of their opening statements. In their opening chapter they say, “I believe in the church. I believe God loves his church, and that he’s quite ticked that his bride looks like ‘Fiona the ogre’ instead of Cameron Diaz.” It seems to me that the rest of the book and the quest of the authors are to create a church that looks like Cam [...]

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    2. Reading entirely through The Tangible Kingdom is like eating toast smothered in strawberry-habanero jam. It’s sweet enough to hold your interest to the last bite, yet hot enough to make people regret it the next morning. The Tangible Kingdom claims to be a book about re-creating the mission of Jesus, his apostles, and the early Christian churches, when, in fact, it’s really about creating an intuitively dreamy fad for those who have been disappointed with organized Christian religion in Amer [...]

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    3. Halter and Smay are church planters who have formed a very different kind of church in Denver, called Adullam. What they have wrestled with are the attractional models of church that often rest on the assumption that people need to believe before they belong. Instead, they tell a story of a porous community that includes Sojourners who become relationally connected to the community and see the life of the kingdom incarnated in this community. How do these relationships happen? Mostly it is becau [...]

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    4. Halter and Smay���s book was an interesting read. While I appreciated their warmth for evangelism and authenticity, I have a major point of contention with one of their opening statements. In their opening chapter they say, ���I believe in the church. I believe God loves his church, and that he���s quite ticked that his bride looks like ���Fiona the ogre��� instead of Cameron Diaz.��� It seems to me that the rest of the book and the quest of the authors are to [...]

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    5. A MUST READ BOOK!!!!!!!!!!Even though I don't agree with Halter and Smay at times (I think they go to far in trying to connect with our rebellious and anti-Christian culture), their project is worth serious study and consideration. They argue (and their own ministry has proven) that every church should be "missional." It is the difference between being and inward-looking and an outward-looking church. We should not just try and attract people to our churches--we need to go out into our communiti [...]

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    6. I think all my friends should read The Tangible Kingdom. I haven't been this inspired by a Christian book someone still alive in a long time. Someone codified many things that we've been doing a Circle of Hope for over a decade and had enough subtle differences to challenge me. This would be good for people trying to lead, trying to have a fresh season walking in the Jesus Way, think that Jesus is cool but churches suck, or are aligned with ideas of community transformation then you will find a [...]

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    7. Short review. The Tangible Kingdom adds to the literature that is trying to help the church reach those that have no church background. I think that the presented model of church is the way that church needs to be done to reach non-Christians. There are weaknesses to the book. The sociological description in the front is weak. But overall the book is good.Full review on my blog at bookwi/the-tangible-kingdom

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    8. I would love to be part of a community like the author describes.

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    9. From the introduction:XviiiIf you're like the authors of this book, you've gone down with a ship or two, trying to make the Kingdom story tangible. You may have tried a few different churches, methods, programs, leaders, teachers, styles, and sizes only to find yourself stuck on a ship that seems to be attracting no one and can barely hold your interest.p. 9Change must be about new, which to us means "fresh, bright, something that intuitively feels right, that causes us not only to dream but to [...]

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    10. Our church rarely has special speakers, and so I checked out Hugh Halter on the internet when I heard he would be in our church. I was disappointed that I would miss hearing him as his focus appears to be engaging with culture relationally rather than staying within the church walls, and since that resonates with me, I decided I should just read one of his books.I'm not sure who his primary audience is for this book. I think he is writing to church planters or pastors primarily, encouraging them [...]

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    11. Tangible Kingdom addresses the assumptions, fears, experiences and prejudice views of believers and non-believers and the lack of understanding that causes miscommunication within the two different communities. Planter churches are showing a new way of spreading the word by missioning to non-believers in a changed environment in everyday society. Many Christians are scared of taking this action because of change, said change would mean leaving the secure and familiar environment. Summary Tangib [...]

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    12. Brought up some interesting points, but not my favorite text approaching missional community. I disagreed with several of the author's stances, some of which were hardly academic, and it seemed like another generic this-is-what-Christians-should-really-be-doing book that everyone smiles and nods at and continues doing what they're doing.

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    13. Inspiring, in parts. Halter calls for a new kind of church gathering and experience. But I don't want to throw the baby out with the bathwater. Many of his practical suggestions for making God's kingdom tangible are just as feasible in a modern, Western church, and that's where I intend to apply them.

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    14. This is the 2nd time I have read this book and it has challenged me. I love the way Hugh Halter calls it like he sees it. It is a truthful and thought provoking read. You may think a follower of Christ and His ways are the same as being a Christian, but are they?

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    15. I think everyone should be putting these ideas to work in their own lives.

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    16. The Tangible Kingdom by Hugh Halter and Matt Smay is essentially a how-to manual for creating a missional / incarnational church. Halter (who is the main voice of the book), both autobiographically and instructionally, defines and describes what a people who are on mission for God (missio dei) should look like. I imagine that many people will balk at this book because of its high focus on being missional and its low focus on typical church forms (such as the church services and preaching). And f [...]

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    17. This book left me conflicted. Much of it was incredibly enjoyable, challenging, exciting, etc. I loved Halter's stories of actually interacting with 'Sojourners' and the postures he adopted that helped them slowly come to a readiness to accept and even prefer Truth. Incredibly inspiring I want to get out of my Christian bubble once and for all.Some of the cons: virtually all the historical data presented (esp. ch7) is incorrect or incredibly reductionistic at best. The method presented for reach [...]

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    18. Be prepared to have your understanding of church challenged. And be ready to truly look at your Christianity If anything be willing to have a look at your beliefs and practices. Yes at times I got annoyed and felt like ' whatever his name is' (the author) was talking down or was boasting I hated his Shrek analogy (with Fiona) but forgive himI thought this was going to be a method to 'your better church now', but it isn't and he even tells the reader not to seek to duplicate what he has done. He [...]

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    19. I found a lot of helpful content in this book in regards to living on mission in our local communities. However, I found the tone cynical and negative towards a large portion of the church who also happen to be the Bride of Christ, and His Beloved. The book seemed to me to have undertones of unresolved hurt. I love the suggestions provided here in how we can move toward a missional lifestyle, and what we can learn from the early church. Unfortunately, I felt that there was an overwhelming focus [...]

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    20. Our senior pastor handed me this book after worship on Sunday, and I think it's the heartbeat of where our church is headed. I found it challenging at almost every point. While it includes some damning indictments of modern evangelicalism, it doesn't leave us there but rather gives us principle and practice for moving the church to a more missional mindset. We get to hear a lot of Halter's story with Adullam, an incarnational community in Denver, but we also are inspired to see how incarnational [...]

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    21. This author's perspective on Missional Living and how a church should be more about engaging in the culture of their community REALLY confirmed the way that I've always lived my life and approached ministry. Hugh Halter's approach for a church to be "incarnational" in their community may come across as unconventional because we have been so accustomed to "attractional" churches! I think he hits the mark on how a church should really function in a community, but some of his approaches to sharing [...]

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    22. This book turns the table on the structure of church and challenges the reader to reexamine their priorities and how they follow Jesus. Words like "missional", "incarnational" and "community" are used so much in American Christianity that they have lost much of their meaning. Halter examines the functions of the early church and explores the true meaning of these words. Followers of Christ are called to live their lives differently and demonstrate the miraculous grace of God in their lives throu [...]

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    23. This is another book that has been out for several years describing a new kind of church. Well, not really church, but a movement intended to incarnate the gospel of the kingdom. I am only now coming to the conversation and found this description really "fits" with our culture, with the cry of the de-churched and with guys like me that have pretty much given up on the attractional model of doing church. I appreciated the description of their journey as a church, especially the stories that put s [...]

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    24. This book harmonizes with several others I have read the past 18 months. The Church needs to change. We are too oriented to program, buildings, horizontal thinking, man-made plans and forms, and religious activity. What we need is transformation. The author uses three intersecting circles to illustrate communion, community, and mission. These correspond to the Up, In and Out of 3DM usage.The book is a story of the Holy Spirit bringing life to a church called Adullam, rather than a how-to "do-it- [...]

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    25. Absolutely loved this book! As a 'traditional' kid growing up in a traditional evangelical setting where evangelism consisted of ideas like inviting people to church & handing out Bible tracts, and we didn't take part in anything that didn't have the 'Christian' label in front of it(concerts, bookstores, music, etc.), this book was a much needed, refreshing challenge for me. I've long felt, as many others have, that the current idea and forms of church need some desperate transformation. The [...]

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    26. If ever there was a true must read for us as believers, this would be it.Hugh takes us through how we are to be the church each and everyday to those around us. One hour on Sunday morning is not enough. This book brings such thought provoking questions that every church member should be asking their leaders, and themselves. "How can we tangibly be the hands and feet of Christ daily?" It starts with our own families, neighborhoods, community, city, state, and world. Hugh will hit you right betwee [...]

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    27. Book written by two Denver pastors about the need to shift the church's focus onto fellowship and outreach. They remind us that the goal of the gospel is not to get people to go to church, and that our energy should not be wasted on church services and programs. Rather, we should spend more time and energy living life among "spiritual sojourners" without feeling guilty about it. People are attracted to Christ by our lives, not our message, and if our lives are not "good news" to those outside th [...]

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    28. Though provoking, heart stirring, in your face are just a few ways to describe Tangible Kingdom. Halter has a way of sharing story and insight that has you both wanting more and yet a little afraid to turn the page; for you know that if you do, your way of thinking/looking at the world is going to be challenged. TK is a hands on guide for discovering how to live a more missionally driven life. While not specifically a "how-to" book on living missionally, TK is full of helpful thoughts/resources [...]

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    29. This is a refreshing and liberating book detailing how to live out "being" the church rather than "attending" church in a building. For those that have attended traditional church for most of their lives, it will leave you scratching your head (or shaking your head) wondering where this philosophy of a more simple and less structured form of church comes from. The authors do a thorough job of explaining that the current model of church is not even close to the model the New Testament describes. [...]

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    30. I just finished reading Tangible Kingdom and I am not sure of another book that I finished that I didn't like. this might be the first. I think the topics in the book are good but at the same time, I feel like he is talking about how most non denominational churches work. for example, he thinks time is better used serving the community on Sunday morning than going to church, so they go to church on Saturday instead. they don't have small groups but instead have villages where people live life to [...]

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